MESH COMPLICATIONS

About mesh

‘Mesh’ is a broad term used to describe a number of different types of manufactured biological or synthetic implantable devices. Mesh is used in a range of surgical procedures to support tissues. In obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G), mesh is one option for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP).

For many women, surgical procedures using mesh provide an effective form of treatment for the distressing effects of SUI and POP. However, some women experience serious complications and there are a number of patient communities who campaign to raise awareness of these concerns.

As of 10 July 2018, a period of high vigilance restriction is in place regarding use of vaginal mesh in England (1,2).

Oxford mesh centre

Oxford mesh centre is one of the BSUG/RCOG accredited units treating women who have significant mesh problems following surgery for SUI or POP where mesh was inserted (3,4).

We are focused on given women effected by the mesh complications the best possible treatment. Laparoscopic minimally invasive approach, that we are particularly experienced and skilled at, offers much quicker recovery with less pain. Laparoscopic approach is especially effective at removing mesh/tapes that eroded into the bladder or urethra. We also offer women laparoscopic native tissue continence surgery after mesh is removed.

LAPAROSCOPIC COLPOSUSPENSION video

We comply with all the BSUG/RCOG Governance requirements, including:

  • comply with set criteria for discussing all women requiring surgery at a joint meeting to help determine best treatment options
  • submit data on all women undergoing surgery onto the national database and report them to MHRA

Information about these units is available from BSUG and the British Association of Urological Surgeons BAUS.

Complications

All complications must be reported via the MHRA Yellow Card Scheme.
More information about how to report mesh complications is available on the British Society of Urogynaecology BSUG website.

If you experience any complications, you must inform your healthcare professional, eg. your doctor (GP). There is a central database of units that can see women who are experiencing significant problems following mesh surgery for SUI or POP. Your healthcare professional will be able to refer you to one of these units.

Your doctor should report the complication to a national registry – this is to ensure the NHS has full details of the number and type of complications experienced by women across the country in order to make informed decisions about future guidance. You can also report complications yourself, directly to the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency via their website, which also includes FAQs for members of the public.

Support groups

There are a number of patient groups who will be able to provide information and support:

References:

1. Department of Health

2. Royal college of Obstetrician & Gynaecologist website 

3. BSUG 

4. NICE 

Videos

LAPAROSCOPIC COMPLETE TVT MESH REMOVAL : A STEP BY STEP TECHNIQUE 

LAPAROSCOPIC MESH REMOVAL FROM THE BLADDER 

LAPAROSCOPIC REMOVAL OF URETHRAL TVT MESH EROSION

LAPAROSCOPIC TVT MESH REMOVAL & BURCH COLPOSUSPENSION

LAPAROSCOPIC INTRA-ABDOMINAL COMPLETE TVT REMOVAL FOR CHRONIC PAIN